How Long Does Prime Rib Take to Cook

Introduction

Is there anything more delicious than a perfectly cooked prime rib? The answer is no. But there’s one question that often comes up when cooking prime rib: how long does it take to cook? While temperature is the most important factor in cooking prime rib, there are several other factors that will affect how long it takes to cook prime rib. In this article, we’ll discuss what they are and how they can help you reach your desired doneness level.

How Long Does It Take to Cook Prime Rib?

The cooking time of a prime rib will vary depending on the size of your roast. For example, if you’re cooking a small roast (about 5 pounds), it will take about 2 hours to reach an internal temperature of 130 degrees F. If you’re cooking a large roast (12 pounds), then it could take up to 3 hours or longer depending on how thick your piece is and what temperature you cook it at.

Regardless of how long it takes for your roast to reach its desired internal temperature, there are some things that are important when preparing this cut:

  • Remove any excess fat from around the outside edge before cooking–this helps prevent burning while roasting
  • Pat dry with paper towels before seasoning with salt and pepper

While temperature is the most important factor in cooking prime rib, there are several other factors that will affect how long it takes to cook prime rib.

how-long-does-prime-rib-take-to-cook

While temperature is the most important factor in cooking prime rib, there are several other factors that will affect how long it takes to cook prime rib.

  • The size of your roast is one of those factors. A smaller piece of meat will cook faster than a larger piece because it has less surface area for heat to penetrate and cook all the way through.
  • Another factor is fat content; more fat means slower cooking because it insulates the meat from heat transfer (like an electric blanket). This gives you more time to enjoy every bite!

How Do You Know When Prime Rib Is Done?

You can use a thermometer to check the temperature of your prime rib. You should insert the probe into the center of the roast and leave it there for 5-10 seconds before removing it. If you don’t have one handy, there are other ways to determine whether or not your roast is done:

  • Listen for a crackling sound as it cooks (this means that juices are releasing from within). This is especially important if you’re cooking over an open flame or in an oven without ventilation–if smoke starts billowing out, turn down your heat immediately!
  • Use visual cues like color changes on both sides of the meat; when they reach their desired shade (browned), remove them from heat immediately so they don’t overcook while resting later on (see below).

Visual cues will tell you when your prime rib is ready.

  • Color: The meat should be a deep, rosy pink. If it’s brown, your roast hasn’t been cooked long enough.
  • Internal temperature: A thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the roast should read 125 F (52 C). If it’s any higher than that, your prime rib has been overcooked and will be dry and tough; if it’s any lower than that, your roast may not have reached its full potential for tenderness and juiciness yet. You can also use an instant-read meat thermometer to get a rough estimate–the temperature will rise about 5 degrees as the meat rests after being removed from heat (see below).
  • Texture: When done properly, prime rib should be tender enough that you can cut into slices with just a fork or spoon; if they’re too chewy or tough when eating them without utensils like steak knives or forks/spoons then they need more time on top of their heat source before serving time arrives!

Touch test.

Once the steak is done, you will know it by touching it. If the meat has a spongy feel, it is rare. If the steak feels firm and springy, then that means your prime rib has reached medium-rare status (or close to). If you want to go well done with your prime rib of choice, then give it another few minutes in the oven so that all parts of it become firm and springy.

Temperature test.

Next, use a meat thermometer to check the temperature of your roast. A good rule of thumb is to remove it from the oven when it reaches 130 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit (54 to 60 Celsius). Insert the thermometer into the thickest part of the roast and leave it there for about 5 seconds before removing. If you don’t have a meat thermometer and are using an oven-safe probe thermometer like our Thermapen Mk4, you can take advantage of its built-in alarm that will let you know when your prime rib has reached its desired internal temperature.

Internal Meat Temperature Chart.

To get the most out of your prime rib, it’s important to know how to use a meat thermometer. This will ensure that you cook your roast long enough and prevent a dry end product.

The internal temperature of cooked meat should be 150 degrees F (65 degrees C). For medium rare, this means an internal temperature of 130 degrees F (55 degrees C) or less; for medium well done, 160 degrees F (71 degrees C).

The end result is looking for an internal temperature of 130 F (54 C) to 140 F (60 C).

The end result is looking for an internal temperature of 130 F (54 C) to 140 F (60 C). This will take about 1 hour per pound. The color of the meat is also important; it should be a rosy red with a slightly browned crust on top. And finally, when you press down gently on the top of your roast and then lift your finger away from it, you should see steam rising up from where you pressed–this means that there’s still moisture left inside your roast and it hasn’t dried out yet!

Conclusion

When cooking prime rib, it’s important to remember that the meat is cooked to a temperature, not time. A good rule of thumb is to take your roast out of the oven at 125 F (52 C) and let it rest for 10 minutes before carving. If you’re using an instant-read thermometer like me (I love them!), then use this handy chart below as a reference point for when your meat should be done based on its internal temperature:

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